Family Governance: Keeping Family Wealth and Relationships in Good Shape

Take a look at how implementing a family governance process can help you to protect your wealth.

“Shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations” is a well-known saying among many affluent families. It means family wealth that’s built by the first generation is eroded or even destroyed by the third generation, which squanders the assets it inherits through reckless spending, poor investment decisions and other mistakes.

  • Very wealthy families typically take a formal approach to family governance.
  • Both the human/relationship and technical aspects of a family governance plan must be addressed.
  • Financial professionals can help families create a governance plan and work to ensure it’s followed and respected over time.

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Family Governance

Other notes and risk warnings

This article is distributed for educational purposes only and must not be considered to be investment advice or an offer of any security for sale. The reference to any products is made only to make educational points and must, in no circumstances, be deemed to be any form of product recommendation.

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. 

It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

 

 

 

 

High Quality Bonds in the Spotlight

There is an old adage in the investment world that ‘diversification is always having to say you are sorry’, as there is usually one (or more) parts of the portfolio that is a bit disappointing.  Every asset class has its day in the spotlight, for good or for bad, at some point.  

Over the past couple of years, shorter-dated, high-quality bonds that constitute strong defensive assets have delivered low returns and have had a finger pointed at them, by some.  Bond yields have been at historical lows, with yields on 5-year UK government gilts at or below 1% for the past three years.  Today they stand at around 0.2% and that is before the impact of inflation.  It is understandable that investors find low yields frustrating, but one needs to look at the bigger picture.  Bonds sit in long-term portfolios predominantly to provide some stability at times of equity market turmoil.

In the face of these low yields, investors have had two straight choices: accept the fact and stoically maintain the quality of their bonds; or go in search of yield by owning lower credit quality bonds and/or bonds of longer maturity.  We know that many have been tempted by the latter strategy.  We have stuck to the former to defend the portfolio at times of equity market turmoil such as this.  Remember that the lower the credit quality of bonds, the more they act like equities.

We think of yield-driven bond strategies – particularly high yield bonds – as akin to picking up pennies in front of a steamroller, which works nicely until you trip over.  The chart below looks at the performance of different types of bonds since the equity markets began to fall in February this year.  

It reveals that high-quality bonds have more or less held their value, doing the job asked of them.  As one moves down the credit spectrum to lower quality companies, returns become increasingly negative.  Owning these lower quality bonds, but with longer maturities, simply magnifies these falls (heading from left to right in the chart).  As it has always done, scared money runs from higher risks (including the possibility of default on bonds from less healthy companies) which drives yields up and prices down. It tends to move into high-quality, liquid assets driving bond yields down and prices up.

 

As Warren Buffet once said:

‘Only when the tide goes out do you discover who’s been swimming naked.’

Fortunately, your portfolio has kept its trunks on!  

 

Use of Morningstar Direct© data

© Morningstar 2020. All rights reserved. The information contained herein: (1) is proprietary to Morningstar and/or its content providers; (2) may not be copied, adapted or distributed; and (3) is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. Neither Morningstar nor its content providers are responsible for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information, except where such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by law in your jurisdiction. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.

Data set

Data label Market index used
Global Govts 1-5 Hdg Markit iBoxx GBP Gilts TR
Gilts 1-5 TR FTSE WGBI 1-5 Yr Hdg GBP
GBP Corp 1-5 TR Markit iBoxx GBP Gilts 1-5 TR
Global Corp TR Hdg GBP Markit iBoxx GBP Corporates 1-5 TR
GBP Corp TR BBgBarc Global Aggregate Corporates TR Hdg GBP
GBP Corp BBB TR Markit iBoxx GBP Corporates TR
Global High Yield TR Hdg GBP Markit iBoxx GBP Corp BBB TR
Emerging Equity BBgBarc Global High Yield TR Hdg GBP
Developed Equity MSCI EM NR USD
UK Equity MSCI World NR USD

 

Risk warnings

This article is distributed for educational purposes only and must not be considered to be investment advice or an offer of any security for sale. The reference to any products is made only to make educational points and must, in no circumstances, be deemed to be any form of product recommendation.

 

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. 

 

It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

 

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

 

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

 

Rebalancing – Do I Really Have to?

Humans have a hard time being investors.  Normally, we like to purchase things when they are cheap and avoid them when they are expensive, but that is often not the case for equities.  We tend to get overly optimistic and enthusiastic when equity markets rise dramatically, as they have done since the Global Financial Crisis a decade ago.  Yet when markets fall materially, we feel bruised and cautious, seeking to hang onto our stable bonds and even selling equities to avoid further falls in portfolio value.  That’s rarely a good idea, especially if you do not need the bulk of your capital in the foreseeable future.

As a client you will know that we have always sought to rebalance your portfolio on a regular basis, by which we mean returning it to the original target allocation that we initially established with you.  Most often, over the past few years, rebalancing has meant selling growth assets (equity-like) and buying defensive assets (bonds) in a contrarian manner.  This has helped to avoid the portfolio becoming dominated, over time, by the riskier growth assets component of the portfolio and to keep you within your emotional tolerance for falls, your financial capacity to weather them and your need to take risk in the first place.

Logically, the reverse also applies; at times like these the proportion of equities in your portfolio will have fallen below their long-term target.  This matters because your portfolio now has too little risk and it will be harder for the growth assets remaining to recoup the falls in value when markets eventually recover.

We can work that idea through with a simple example.  Imagine you own a £10,000 portfolio split 50% (£5,000) into growth assets and 50% into defensive assets.  In the growth assets portion, you own 50 units of a global equity fund priced at £100 per unit.  Growth assets fall by 40%.  Let’s assume your defensive assets are unchanged in value.  You still own 50 global equity fund units, but they are now priced at £60.  Your growth-defensive split has moved from 50/50 to 37.5/62.5.  Time to rebalance.

Figure 1: Market falls leave you underweight growth assets

Rebalancing

Source: Albion Strategic Consulting

Rebalancing i.e. buying equities to realign the portfolio with its allocation target, helps to ensure a quicker recovery back to where you started.  This is because the breakeven price of your equity holdings is now lower.

So, let’s now assume that you rebalance by taking £1,000 from your defensive assets and buying growth assets to get you back to a 50/50 split (left hand grid below).  You can buy 16.7 units at £60 with the £1,000 raised.  To get your portfolio back to its starting value of £10,000 your now 66.7 global equity units need to rise 50% to £90 per unit (middle grid).  However, an un-rebalanced portfolio (right hand grid) only rises to £9,500 with this 50% rise.  In fact, to get back to a portfolio value of £10,000 and un-rebalanced portfolio requires a rise of 67% in the global equity units to £100.

Figure 2: Rebalancing helps the portfolio to recover faster

Rebalancing

Source: Albion Strategic Consulting

Even if the markets fall again after rebalancing, the opportunity exists to rebalance again, likewise further reducing the rate of return required to get back to where you were compared to un-rebalanced portfolios.  That takes courage and discipline, when your emotions are telling you to do the opposite.

The issue of a potential rebalance on the back of large market falls is certainly being considered and don’t be surprised if we raise this with you.  You now know why.  Remember, if you are drawing an income from your portfolio, withdrawing from bonds can get you closer to your target.  Likewise, if you have incoming cashflows, this too can be used to buy growth assets.

As David Swensen, CIO of Yale University’s Endowment and one of the world’s most highly respected institutional investors states[1]:

‘The fundamental purpose of rebalancing lies in controlling risk, not enhancing returns.  Rebalancing trades keep portfolios at long-term policy targets by reversing deviations resulting from asset class performance differentials.  Disciplined rebalancing activity requires a strong stomach and serious staying power.’

Do you really need to rebalance?  The answer for most investors is likely to be ‘yes’ when the time comes.  If we feel a rebalance is necessary, we will be in touch to discuss this with you.

As ever, please feel free to give us a call if you have any questions.

Risk warnings

This article is distributed for educational purposes only and must not be considered to be investment advice or an offer of any security for sale. The reference to any products is made only to make educational points and must, in no circumstances, be deemed to be any form of product recommendation.
This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed.

It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

[1]    Swensen, D., (2000) Pioneering Portfolio Management.  New York: The Free Press

Covid-19 Measures: March 2020

The 11 March Budget from the new Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, included £7 billion of expenditure targeting the impact of Covid-19 on employees, the self-employed and businesses. On 17 March a further raft of measures was announced, amounting to an additional £20 billion of support expenditure plus £330 billion of loan guarantees. By 20 March another round of support was announced of such size that no price tag was attached.

 

The Chancellor’s 17 March statement was accompanied by a repeated promise that he would do “whatever it takes” to counter the impact of the virus. Three days later, his second statement gave an indication of how large ‘whatever it takes’ is becoming, with potentially more to come.

 

We have pulled together a round-up of the key announcements so far for businesses and individuals including useful links to government sites.

 

Measures for business

 

Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS)

Some form of job support scheme had been expected after the 17 March announcement and the CJRS is similar to schemes that have already been set up elsewhere in Europe. Under the CJRS, “HMRC will reimburse 80% of furloughed workers wage costs, up to a cap of £2,500 per month’. In this context ‘furloughed workers’ are non-working employees who are kept on the payroll, rather than being laid off. The employer has to designate these employees and submit relevant information to HMRC via a “new online portal”.

 

Statutory sick pay (SSP)

Businesses with fewer than 250 employees will be refunded the full cost of providing SSP to any employee off work for up to 14 days because of coronavirus.

 

Loan guarantees

A government-backed loan guarantee scheme announced in the Budget has since been twice enhanced.  The Government will now provide loan guarantees up to “an initial” £330 billion for all sizes of businesses:

 

  • For large firms, the Bank of England is launching a Covid Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF), which “will provide funding to businesses by purchasing commercial paper of up to one-year maturity, issued by firms making a material contribution to the UK economy”.

 

  • For small and medium sized businesses The loan limit on the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (originally announced in the Budget at £1.2 million) is now £5 million. No interest will be due for the first twelve months and lender-levied fees will be covered. The scheme will be delivered through commercial lenders, backed by the British Business Bank. Eligible SMEs must be UK-based with turnover of not more than £45 million and meet “the other British Business Bank eligibility criteria”.

 

For the period between 20 March 2020 and 30 June 2020, businesses will not be required to make a VAT payment. Instead they will be able to defer this payment until the end of the 2020/21. VAT refunds and reclaims will be paid by the government as normal. No applications will be required as the process will be automatic.

 

For the self-employed, self assessment income tax payments due on the 31 July 2020 (the second payment on account for 2019/20) will be deferred until the 31 January 2021. This also will not require an application. Penalties and interest for late payment will not be charged in the deferral period.

 

Business Rates Retail Discount 

All shops, cinemas, restaurants, music venues and business operating in the leisure and hospitality sectors will have no business rates to pay in 2020/21.

 

On 17 March the Chancellor also promised an additional cash grant of “up to £25,000 per business” to businesses with a rateable value of less than £51,000 – i.e. those that would have benefited from the old version of Business Rates Retail Discount Scheme.

 

Businesses already eligible for small business rates relief

There will be a flat £10,000 cash grant for each business that already benefits from zero or reduced business rates because of small business rate relief.

 

Insurance cover

Although the government has not required the leisure and hospitality businesses to close, on 17 March the Chancellor said that “for those businesses which do have a policy that covers pandemics, the government’s action is sufficient and will allow businesses to make an insurance claim against their policy”. However, pandemic cover is not a feature of most business disruption cover, a point underlined by the Association of British Insurers in a statement it issued on 17 March.

 

Off-payroll working in the private sector (IR35)

Also on 17 March, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Steve Barker, said in a statement to the House of Commons that the start date for the new IR35 tax rules would be deferred to 6 April 2021.

 

Time to Pay (TTP)

In the Budget, the Chancellor announced that HMRC would scale up its Time To Pay service, giving businesses and the self-employed the chance to defer tax payments.

 

Government guidance for employers and businesses is here and business support details are here.

 

Measures for individuals

 

Mortgage holidays

For people who find themselves in financial difficulties because of coronavirus, mortgage lenders will offer at least a three-month mortgage holiday.

 

Statutory sick pay (SSP)

SSP is currently paid at the rate of £94.25 a week, rising to £95.85 from April. It is now available to employees from day one, instead of day four, for those who are suffering from the virus or who have been advised to self-isolate. So far there has been no change in the minimum earnings threshold for SSP (£118 a week currently, rising to £120 a week in 2020/21).

 

Individuals ineligible for SSP

Self-employed and gig economy workers generally do not qualify for SSP. Instead they may be entitled to Contributory Employment and Support Allowance.

 

Covid-19 sufferers and self-isolators will be able to claim the benefit from day one instead of day eight. The minimum income floor in Universal Credit (UC) has been temporarily removed to ensure that time off work because of sickness is reflected in benefits.

 

For 12 months from 6 April 2020, the standard allowance in Universal Credit (UC) and the basic element in Working Tax Credit (WTC) for will be increased by the equivalent of about £20 a week over and above planned annual uprating (which were to £323.22 per month for UC for age 25 and over and £1,995 a year for WTC). This effectively brings UC into line with the rate of SSP. The change will apply to all new and existing UC claimants and to existing WTC claimants.

 

Housing benefit

Housing benefit and the housing element of UC will be increased so that the Local Housing Allowance will cover at least 30% of market rents.

 

Hardship Fund

The Chancellor announced in the Budget a £500 million Hardship Fund, which would be distributed to Local Authorities so that they could support the vulnerable.

 

Government guidance for employees is here.

 

On Thursday 26 March, Chancellor Rishi Sunak made his long-awaited statement about the Covid-19 government support scheme for the self-employed, called the Self-employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS). Reports suggest that the announcement had been slow to arrive because of the greater difficulty in structuring and running a scheme that relied on annual information (via tax returns) and could not operate via the PAYE system.
 

Main provisions for the self-employed

 

The main points from the Chancellor’s statement and accompanying press release are:

  • The SEISS will pay a directly payable taxable grant to the self-employed (including members of partnerships) based on 80% of profits averaged over the last three tax years (or shorter periods if self-employment started after 2016/17), subject to a maximum of £2,500 a month. In a recent briefing note from the Institute for Fiscal Studies, it was suggested that the £2,500 figure (which also applies to the employees’ Job Retention Scheme) is the maximum payment that will be made, not the maximum earnings that are protected, i.e. 80% of up to £37,500 of profits ([£37,500 x 80%] /12 = £2,500) will be covered.
  • The initial payment term of the SEISS grant will be “at least three months”.
  • The payment of the grant will not prevent the claimant from continuing to work.
  • The SEISS will be restricted in three ways:
    • Self-employment must provide the majority of the claimant’s income. It is unclear how this is calculated.
    • Trading profits either:
      • are less than £50,000 in 2018/19; or
      • trading profit was less than £50,000 averaged over the three tax years from 2016/17.

 

According to the Chancellor, these thresholds mean the scheme covers 95% of the self-employed. The corollary is that it creates a cliff edge at £50,000, a figure that appears elsewhere in the tax system (e.g. the higher rate tax threshold).

  • The claimant must have submitted a 2019 tax return (covering the 2018/19 tax year). As a concession, any later filer will have four weeks to submit their overdue return if they wish to be included in the scheme.

 

HMRC will use their existing information to assess eligibility and contact individuals directly, requesting completion of “a simple online form”. A gov.uk webpage gives more details, but is somewhat confusingly headed “Claim a grant through the coronavirus (COVID-19) Self-employment Income Support Scheme”. The “don’t call us, we’ll call you” approach is aimed at preventing HMRC being overwhelmed with telephone queries, as has happened with the DWP’s Universal Credit system.

  • Payments from HMRC should start at the beginning of June. The initial sum will represent three months’ cumulative payments. Until then the self-employed can claim Universal Credit. In his statement the Chancellor said Universal Credit could give a self-employed person with a non-working partner and two children, living in the social rented sector, support of up to £1,800 a month.
  • Anyone whose self-employment started after 5 April 2019 and thus has no self-employed earnings recorded with HMRC cannot benefit from the scheme and must rely on Universal Credit.
  • Those who operate through one person companies are not covered by the scheme as, despite the media label often given to them, they are not self-employed. The Treasury press release states that such people “will be covered for their salary by the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme if they are operating PAYE schemes”. The use of the word ‘salary’ is key here, as many one person companies route the bulk of their employee’s remuneration via dividends to reduce National Insurance liabilities.

 

In his closing remarks the Chancellor noted that “…in devising this scheme … it is now much harder to justify the inconsistent contributions between people of different employment statuses”. This was a subtle way of suggesting that National Insurance contributions will have to rise for the self-employed once the crisis is over.

 

Coronavirus Act

 

The day before the Chancellor’s latest statement, the Coronavirus Act 2020 received Royal Assent. This 348-page Act deals with a broad range of Covid-19 related measures (many of which exclude Scotland because of its devolved powers), including:

  • Food supply.
  • Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) modifications, e.g. funding of the employer’s liabilities.
  • Suspension of the complex abatement rules that either reduce or suspend NHS pensions on an individual’s return to work.
  • Uprating of working tax credit.
  • Protection from eviction for residential tenancies to 30 September 2020.
  • Protection from forfeiture for commercial tenancies to 30 June 2020.

 

The explanatory notes for the original Bill (introduced on 19 March ) are here.

Updated government Covid-19 guidance on business support is here and for employees is here.

 

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

How Playing the Long Game Could Help Build Wealth and Success

We have found that many successful people have one thing in common: They have a very good handle on a concept that is key to success: the long game.

The long game means having a concrete vision of your ideal future down the road the road – years or even decades from now – and talking specific, carefully considered action steps at every stage along the way to maximise your ability to get there.

  • Start with your ideal long-term vision of what you want to achieve.
  • Build a list of smaller goals and specific action steps that will make your vision a reality.
  • Persevere through challenges – while also remaining flexible as circumstances change.

Click the image below to read the full article:

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

 

Top Tips for Staying Calm in Today’s Markets

At times like this, it is sometimes worth reminding ourselves that it is this very uncertainty of shorter-term market outcomes that delivers investors with returns above those of placing bank deposits.  This allows us to grow our purchasing power over time.  In the case of equities, this uncertainty can be high as the market adjusts its view of long-term earnings and the discount rate it uses to establish market prices.  If there was no uncertainty, then there would be no equity premium.

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Staying calm in today's markets

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

Property Sellers Warned About Changes In CGT Rules

CIOT warns property owners to plan for a ‘seismic change’ on how CGT will be payable on residential property capital gains from April 2020.

The Chartered Institute of Taxation recently issued a press release alerting property owners who make taxable gains on their residential properties to plan for a ‘seismic change’ in how tax is paid.

From 6 April 2020 UK residents who sell a residential property that gives rise to a capital gains tax (CGT) liability, e.g. a buy-to-let property, must send a new standalone online return to HMRC and pay the tax due within 30 days of completion of the sale. This new filing and payment timeframe is, of course, different from the current position where taxpayers have until the self-assessment deadline (31 January after the tax year in which the disposal is made) to complete a tax return and pay the CGT.

The current system means that, depending on timing of the sale, CGT is due anything from 10 months to 22 months after the sale or disposal. The new 30-day deadline means people will have less time to calculate the CGT, report the gain and pay the tax.

The new return will need to be done online, requiring taxpayers to have a Government Gateway account to either submit the return themselves or to digitally authorise a tax agent to do it for them.

The CIOT has also received confirmation from HMRC, for the avoidance of any doubt, that the new reporting and payment regime applies only to taxable gains accruing on disposals of UK residential property made on or after 6 April 2020 (in the tax year 2020/21). This means that where contracts are exchanged under an unconditional contract in the tax year 2019/20 (6 April 2019 to 5 April 2020) but completion takes place on or after 6 April 2020 the 30 days filing requirement does not apply. The gain should be reported in the 2019/20 self-assessment return in the usual way.

If, however, exchange of contracts takes place on or after 6 April 2020, or the contract is conditional and the condition is not satisfied until after 6 April 2020, a return will be required within 30 days of completion of the transaction together with a payment on account within the same 30 days’ timescale.

COMMENT:

Those selling second properties or buy to let properties on or after 6 April 2020 will be brought within the scope of these new rules and will therefore need to ensure that they plan ahead to meet the necessary deadlines otherwise could face penalties. They will also need to have an understanding of their income position as the rate of CGT applicable will depend on their income for the whole of the tax year.

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

 

Don’t Leap Before You Look! The Benefits of Thoughtful Action

This article explores the benefits that come with the use of thoughtful action along with how quick-thinking is perceived and rewarded.

When people are confronted with adversity, opportunity or both, they often react quickly – with the intention of dealing with the situation rapidly and moving forward. These reflexively gut-driven responses are often rewarded by our culture, which praises the “fast-acting-do-er” who “gets the job done” or “puts out fires.”

Trouble is, rapid action can often result in adverse outcomes.

  • Quick responses to problems and opportunities don’t always lead to good results.
  • Thoughtful action rooted in your goals and in deep insights into a situation can create much better outcomes.
  • Accept your emotional reactions to big-moment situations – but don’t let them drive your decisions.

Click the image below to read the full article:

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

The Need for Wealth Management Before and After You Sell Your Business

This article puts a real emphasis on the importance of carefully considered wealth management and in particular, the benefits of such planning when you choose to sell your business.

Effective wealth management should be an important aspect of all stages of your career. That’s because wealth management is designed to coordinate a broad range of components of your financial life over time – from investments to estate planning, asset protection planning and charitable giving – around your needs and wants. It’s also designed to coordinate a team of experts to help deliver the financial outcomes you seek.

  • A windfall from the sale of a business can present investment management problems that must be addressed.
  • Estate planning can become a big issue if you sell your business for a lot of money.
  • Assets also should be protected post-sale.

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The Need for Wealth Management Before and After You Sell Your Business

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

Stress Testing Your Wealth Plan: Three Keys to Success

We see that stress testing is becoming an increasingly popular activity among the wealthy and their advisors. It involves putting a wealth plan through its paces – evaluating and accessing it to see if the strategies being used are likely to achieve a wealthy family’s key financial goals and objectives. Stress testing also seeks to identify any strategies or opportunities that are currently being overlooked but that could add significant value to the family’s financial life.

  • Seek out professionals who really “get” what stress testing is all about.
  • A professional has to know you as a person to do an effective stress test.
  • Technically skilled professionals can add the most value to a stress test.

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Click here to find out more about how to successfully stress test

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.