Four Key Lessons About Life – and Death – From a Rock Star Entrepreneur

Phil Carroll was a self-proclaimed rock-star real estate investor and entrepreneur who made his first million dollars in his 20s selling luxury houseboats and ramping up from there.

But at age 47, everything changed: He was diagnosed with prostate cancer. While most men survive such cancer, Phil died from it five years later.

  • Positive attitude + positive action = profound success.
  • Progress can be slow – but focus is power.
  • Value your health as much as you value your business or your career.

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Four Key Lessons About Life

Other notes and risk warnings

This article is distributed for educational purposes only and must not be considered to be investment advice or an offer of any security for sale. The reference to any products is made only to make educational points and must, in no circumstances, be deemed to be any form of product recommendation.

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. 

It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

How Key Person Life Insurance Can Keep Your Business Afloat

As a business owner, do you feel like there are certain people on your team you can’t live without – people who are so important to the success of your enterprise that their absence would be felt across the company, and who would be extremely difficult to replace.

Without safeguards, the loss of these key people (including. of course, you as the owner) can be devastating to a company’s financial health and ability to stay on top – or even keep the lights on!

  • The death of a key employee or team member can hurt – even potentially sink – your business.
  • Key person life insurance is underused by entrepreneurs.
  • Key person insurance can cover the cost of finding a replacement for the vital team member.

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key person

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

The Entrepreneur’s Common Sense Guide to Heart Health

This article lists 6 ways to improve your heart health that are easy to introduce into your daily routine.

Key takeaways from the article:

  • Twenty-two chronic heart diseases, including heart disease, cancer, dementia, diabetes, arthritis and obesity, have been linked to how many hours a day you sit.
  • Vegetables taste a whole lot better than chemotherapy or surgery.
  • Go beyond the usual heart tests – ask your doctor for advanced lab work that reveals more information about your arteries.

Click the image below to read the full article:

Heart Health Article

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

New dietary supplements promise greater longevity, but does the science back them up?

Several companies are touting dietary supplements as the latest key to longevity

Supplements

Sometimes marketed under the vague term “nutraceuticals,” these products—pills, powders and drinks, often containing nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and herbs— cannot be categorized as food, additives or drugs, so the FDA does not regulate them. But they purport to have scientifically based benefits.

The marketing is working: These substances are gaining popularity, particularly in Silicon Valley, where living longer has become a kind of Holy Grail for problem-solving techies. One of my patients recently asked me about one of the most popular substances, Basis, which is sold by a startup called Elysium Health. Basis has attracted a lot of buzz recently with feature articles in Fast Company, Wired and New York that have focused on its attractive packaging and subscription model. (Basis is available for $50 a month or $480 a year.) My patient wondered whether he should take this pill in an effort to live a longer, healthier life—essentially the promise that Basis makes with its claim to “support well-being at the cellular level.”

Any product touting medical benefits ought to have legitimate science behind it

A little context first: There are some truly beneficial substances in the dietary supplements marketplace. Vitamin D, coenzyme Q10, selenium and fish oil have all undergone extensive scientific research that shows their effectiveness at boosting the immune system and staving off heart disease. But there is also a lot of mistruth, obfuscation and outright deception in the supplements field because the products are not subject to the same level of FDA scrutiny as prescription medications; supplements do not require government approval to be sold. If you’re considering incorporating these substances into your regimen, you should be well armed with questions like what’s in them, whether they deliver what they promise and whether they have side effects. That’s why I was moved to inspect Basis more closely.

Led by a group of tech investment executives, Elysium, a 4-year-old company that began selling Basis in 2015, finished a round of series-B funding in December 2016. That detail matters because it shows that Elysium is adopting the path of a tech startup, not a pharmaceutical company. This business mentality is evidenced in the careful wording on its website. Here’s the promise of Elysium’s Basis: “Cells need the coenzyme NAD+ to function, and NAD+ declines as we age. Basis is clinically proven to increase NAD+ levels.” Read that carefully: The statement says nothing about longevity, just the level of coenzyme—a nutrient—in our bodies.

Elysium’s marketing materials make a big deal about the members of its advisory board, which includes 20 notable scientists and Nobel laureates. Its website prominently features their headshots and achievements, resembling a Who’s Who of the scientific community: Aaron Ciechanover, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, kicks off the list with his accomplishments in cancer biology; he’s followed by neuroscientist Eric Kandel and his work with molecular biology and memory. But if you don’t read carefully, you might overlook the fact that their achievements don’t amount to an endorsement of Basis. Board members’ “sole role is to advise Elysium on the development and testing of its compounds,” Thomas C. Südhof, a Stanford University neurophysiologist and Elysium board member, told the MIT Technology Review last year. What that actually means is hard to say.

Of course, aggressive marketing doesn’t mean that a product is fraudulent. So to assess whether Basis is worth considering, I asked three questions based in clinical science.

Is it harmless?

In other words, will my patient get hurt from using Basis? The answer is: probably not, but we don’t know for certain. Though cells with elevated NAD+ levels may act and look younger, that doesn’t mean they truly are younger—leaving the true effects of elevated NAD+ distressingly unknown.

Is it scientifically sensible?

Any product touting medical benefits ought to have legitimate science behind it, and claims made by its manufacturers and distributors must be logical. With Basis, the question is whether correlation equals causality. Elysium points to a study it funded to suggest that Basis does produce results, but that study— despite being published last October in the peer-reviewed Nature Partner Journal: Aging and Mechanisms of Disease—was conducted with very carefully chosen criteria. Did taking a daily boost of a NAD+ precursor increase NAD+ levels? Yes—but that’s like asking if daily iron supplements will increase blood iron levels. Of course they will. Elysium could have tested using different, more meaningful criteria, like examining if increased NAD+ levels reduced free-radical damage or inflammation. An Elysium spokesperson told me that demonstrating the safe increase of NAD+ levels in humans was an important first step. “We plan to look at several more endpoints in future studies, including inflammation,” he said.

Is Basis beneficial?

There is now no clear indication that Basis will have a positive effect on the life of my patient or any other—just the correlation that Elysium points out between aging and reduced NAD+. Yet I wonder how all the extra NAD+ that is normally not present in an older cell is processed. Could that have adverse effects that are not fully understood? Elysium’s study was only 60 days in duration—far too short a time frame to gauge any benefit in longevity or the potential negative effects on cellular health.

Ultimately, I think there is something potentially quite good in Basis, but I am hesitant because of my observation of other healthcare startups whose advisory boards, funding and valuations had little correlation to their products’ efficacy. While I am excited to see the results of further Basis studies, I told my patient to watch and wait for now.
Until there’s more evidence, I advised him to stick to the mainstays of longevity: sleeping well, eating well, exercising moderately and taking scientifically valid supplements.

 

DAN CARLIN, a physician, is CEO of
WorldClinic, a New London,
N.H.-based telemedicine practice.

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

How Sleep Gives You A Competitive Edge

Getting enough sleep is just as important as diet and exercise for your overall health. Degenerative illnesses, cardiovascular disease and premature death are all risks that increase when you are sleep deprived.

In this article by Dan Carlin, a physician and CEO of WorldClinic, we explore some of the best ways to remedy sleep deprivation.

Some of the key takeaways are:

Do

  • Get seven to eight hours every night.
  • Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.
  • Limit exposure to “blue light” at least one hour before bedtime (you can do this by using the “night shift” feature on your iPhone/iPad or similar applications for other devices).
  • Get evaluated for sleep apnea if you are a heavy snorer (sleep apnea is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease).

Don’t

  • Try to get by on five or six hours a night and “catch up” by sleeping more than eight hours later.
  • Change your bed and wake times frequently. This leaves your brain perpetually jet-lagged.
  • Rely on stimulants and/ or sedatives to wake up and fall asleep. They interfere with your ability to get truly restorative sleep. Alcohol is especially disruptive.
  • Take hot showers or vigorously exercise within three to four hours of going to bed.
  • Eat within two hours of bedtime.

Read the full article below from worth.com (November 2017-January 2018 edition).

sleep

A patient of mine, a partner at a New York– based private equity firm, recently called asking for a prescription for Ambien. He had a major negotiation in London coming up and, planning to arrive across the pond right before his meeting, he wanted the sleep medication to “fix” the resulting jet lag. Instead, I gave him simple advice: Arrive two days early and just sleep—without the aid of alcohol, sedatives or stimulants. He thought I was crazy.

Many ambitious people, like my patient, tend to see sleep deprivation as a sign of drive and commitment. In reality, few things can make you more powerless. My most successful clients value sleep and are strict about sticking to a healthy sleep schedule. They know that a well-rested brain is their greatest asset. Good sleep is the key to cognitive fitness, and it is just as important as diet and exercise for overall health. Not having enough sleep can lead to degenerative illnesses, cardiovascular disease and premature death.

The dangers of sleep deprivation are well documented, with study after study confirming the importance of rest to our bodies. One particular study, published in 2015 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, followed nurses over a 22-year period, showing that those who worked night shifts for a prolonged period had a 23 percent higher risk of dying from heart disease.

Despite the evidence, our culture has been slow to accept the curative value of sleep. In fact, more than a third of Americans aren’t getting the necessary seven or more hours of sleep per night, and the average night’s rest is 1.1 hours shorter today than it was in 1942, according to data from Gallup.

Most people don’t know how to recognize when they’re sleep deprived. This is because the overwhelming presence of phone and computer screens and other light sources is removing our natural cue for sleep: darkness. A photopigment in our eyes called melanopsin tells our brain how much light is around us and, correspondingly, whether or not it is time to sleep. It plays a crucial role in setting our circadian rhythm—the “body clock” that regulates our biological processes. So if our eyes are constantly exposed to light, our brains don’t receive the signal to rest, and we remain as active as possible until exhaustion overtakes us.

This is a serious health risk because sleep is the foundation of our body’s ability to clear away the cellular waste that accumulates from the constant functioning of our organs including our brains and hearts—free radicals that cause vascular and neuronal injury. Without adequate sleep, this damage accumulates over time, leading to a rapid decline in executive functioning skills—the kind of skills that would help my patient process and analyze information for his negotiation, for example—in addition to increased mortality risk. After a bad night’s sleep, proteins linked to Alzheimer’s and dementia build up, blood sugar and insulin levels increase, and the ability to retain, analyze and process new information decreases.

Unaware of the effects of sleep deprivation, my patient thought that he could “hack” a good night’s rest with medication. But sleep aids like Ambien actually prevent the restful sleep that would make his brain function at its peak.

The good news is that although the effects of sleep deprivation are severe, getting more good-quality sleep has immediate benefits. One study from Oregon Health and Science University found that sleeping longer significantly reduced the brain plaques created by the amyloid-beta protein that are associated with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

My patient, if a little skeptical, ended up taking my advice. He wasn’t sure he could justify spending more hours doing “nothing” each night. Getting seven to eight hours of uninterrupted sleep, however, would gradually adjust his circadian rhythm in time for his meeting. When I called to check on his progress, he said he hadn’t felt so mentally sharp since he was a teenager. It was all in a good night’s rest.

sleep

DAN CARLIN, a physician, is CEO of
WorldClinic, a New London,
N.H.-based telemedicine practice.

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

What to Do When Your Doctor Has Bad News

It’s what no one ever wants to hear: “The test results have come back positive.

And yet it’s quite likely that you, a loved one or both will one day be given a serious health diagnosis that throws your world into uncertainty, confusion and fear. That means you have two choices:

  • Wish and hope that you or someone you care about never gets really bad news from a physician—and be forced to react quickly and emotionally if that does happen.
  • Be proactive and get a handle now on the best steps to take if you’re faced with a major medical diagnosis.

You can likely guess which approach we recommend. With that in mind, we asked one of the nation’s top concierge physicians—Dr. Dan Carlin of WorldClinic—for his best advice on what to do (and not do) when the news about your health is really bad.

GET GROUNDED

When faced with a shocking medical diagnosis, it’s natural to let emotions—sadness, anger, depression—take over. Another common emotional response, fear, causes many people in these situations to want to immediately hit the ground running and take action for action’s sake—for example, by starting whatever treatment is most readily available.

Carlin’s advice: Slow down. Start by internalizing two foundational concepts that will help guide you through this process more successfully.

Don’t play good day, bad day. 

People tend to respond too strongly to the latest bit of news (good or bad) about their health and treatments. Start the process by recognizing there will be a lot of ups and downs along the way so you’re not tempted to put too much weight on any one moment or development. “The downs aren’t as horrible as you think they are—and the ups aren’t as miraculous as they might seem,” says Carlin.

Get ready to be tougher, more patient and more emotionally disciplined than you’ve ever been.

Treating cancer or another serious disease can be a long road. It requires stamina that won’t be there unless you can find ways to manage your emotions at each step. That will help you stay rational and thoughtful so you can make the best decisions that lead to the best outcomes. Something else you’ll need more than ever before is patience. Says Carlin: “If you lash out at those around you, you end up creating a bad dynamic with the members of your care team and even your family members. A little bit of information can cause you to become hypercritical—but you don’t want to do that, because it hurts your efforts and outcomes. Emotional maturity will maximize your outcome and help your team perform optimally for you.”

FINDING THE HELP YOU NEED

Consider finding a physician who has the skills and the resources to act essentially as your traffic cop—an interpreter, advocate and navigator who can evaluate and coordinate the efforts of the entire team that will work with you on the road to recovery.

The benefits of having one primary care physician who can serve those roles are many:

  • They either know the top specialists in your disease or have the resources to find them, as well as the ability to access them and get them working with you.
  • They have the expertise needed to interpret treatment recommendations and plans from various specialists and ensure that all actions taken are coordinated and working in concert for optimal outcomes.
  • They can act objectively to ensure that no one member of your health care team exerts too much control or ignores other specialists.

That said, not all physicians are created equal—and in today’s world, identifying a doctor who can and will do these things well is far from easy. Carlin recommends looking for a few key characteristics in a physician:

Trust and communication

Is the doctor someone with whom you feel comfortable being open? With a major medical diagnosis, you can experience a long and often bumpy journey with a lot of moving parts. You want a provider you can talk with frankly about technical and medical matters, but also about your emotions and personal concerns.

Expertise

Trust your gut about the doctor—but then verify. Carlin points out that many doctors with great bedside manner lack the skills and qualifications to coordinate an advanced team of experts meant to help you navigate your illness and get better. To avoid doctors who just don’t measure up, look for ones who are board-certified and who run independent community practices—i.e. they are not part of a large medical centre that may be unwilling to look for specialists and other resources outside its network.

Fee-based

A truly independent physician’s income will not rely on insurance company reimbursements or payments from a corporate parent. You want to work with a doctor to whom you write a check. That way, you can be confident that the physician is sitting on the same side of the table as you at every stage. “The idea is to work with someone who has no conflicts, whose only job is to advocate for you and what’s best for your health,” says Carlin.

References from other physicians

The whole point of working with this type of physician is to have one point of contact who can coordinate the efforts of other doctors. One of the best ways to find out if a physician can do that is to ask for references from other doctors and health care specialists. A great primary care physician should be able to demonstrate that he or she has lots of high-quality relationships.

Obviously, your best bet is to be as ready as you reasonably can for a bad diagnosis before it comes. The good news is that concierge medical practices are becoming increasingly common. Many of these practices are designed to provide a higher level of care than traditional doctors do—and the best can serve as care coordinators and advocates for patients facing difficult diagnoses.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: This article was published by the BSW Inner Circle, a global financial concierge group working with affluent individuals and families and is distributed with its permission. Copyright 2018 by AES Nation, LLC.

 

Other notes and risk warnings

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.

Stem Cells: The Key to Active Longevity and Quality of Life as You Age

Dr. Dan Carlin, co-author of The World of Concierge Medicine, talks here about stem cells and how they might just be the key to a long and active life.

“You’ve probably heard about how stem cells have the potential to cure all sorts of conditions, but what many people don’t know is that they can harness the power of stem cells for themselves right now.

The story of one of my patients shows how stem cells can help with one of the most common problems of aging, osteoarthritis.  With stem cell therapy, she was able to avoid a knee replacement and get back to pain-free activity fast.

Her journey began with seeing several orthopedic surgeons about her osteoarthritis. Her first two treatment options were typical: inject artificial joint fluid into the knee to temporarily reduce pain, or undergo a total knee replacement and commit to three months of physical therapy. She felt that there had to be a better option and reached out to us. We worked with a stem-cell expert and orthopedist in Europe to create a treatment plan that included injecting the knee with her own stem cells after undergoing an extensive surgical clean-out of the damaged cartilage and old scar tissue. She went to Europe for treatment and was soon back to walking and golfing with her friends.

My patient didn’t realize it, but the stem cells actually had a far greater effect on her longevity than just letting her play tennis and exercise. Being pain-free meant more physical and social activity, both of which have proven anti-aging benefits.

With a good physician on your side, anyone can access the amazing power of stem cells. To learn more, check out my book The World of Concierge Medicine, which shows you how to find a great physician and has more examples of cutting-edge longevity treatments.”

If you would like a copy of Dr. Dan’s book, The World of Concierge Medicine, please get in touch and I’ll happily provide you with a PDF version.

Balance Wealth, Time & Health With Concierge Medicine

What’s the point of wealth if you haven’t retained the good health to enjoy it?

Balancing wealth, time and health is a lifelong challenge. Last year, I say in a fascinating talk by Dr Dan Carlin from World Clinic about the potential changing face of healthcare over the coming years. Technical advancements mean we can now predict future health issues for an individual person and build a suitable longevity plan to address them.

Watch the video to find out more and to receive a PDF version of a new book about how concierge medicine can help you and your family live long and healthy lives.

The Road to Longevity: Living to 120—and Beyond?

Medical technology can now identify risk factors in the human body long before they impact your health

A medical revolution is underway—one that’s making it possible for us to extend our lives for decades by stopping now-fatal diseases before they can take hold of our bodies. In the coming years, we’ll not only be able to live longer, but also have fuller lives characterized by enduring physical mobility and mental sharpness.

Here’s a closer look at the personal longevity revolution—and what it could mean to you and your family as you seek to live your best life.

Stop disease before it starts: the power of biomarkers and genomes

Perhaps the most interesting component of longevity care is the role of biomarkers in understanding genomic risk and promoting long-term health.

Biomarkers are biological data points that reveal the current physical state of affairs of a particular condition. Most biomarkers are blood tests for future risk, but they also might include other health data points like a calcium score or even simpler values like heart rhythm and blood pressure.

Biomarkers are nothing new, but they can now be used in advanced ways thanks to personal genome sequencing—a process that can reveal a specific future health risk you face so you can stop it in its tracks. What’s more, new health biomarkers are being identified regularly—giving doctors more data points to examine and track in the pursuit of longevity. (Bonus: The costs of gene sequencing and biomarker analysis are also coming down.)

A person’s unique genome is just that—unique. Genomic mapping and analysis enables doctors to identify the specific processes that lead to the creation of a future disease state. Once a biomarker corresponding to that future disease is identified, a detailed protocol can be developed to track and manage it.

Bottom line: You can know if you have specific risk factors in your body that could lead to major health problems, long before those health problems ever rear their ugly heads. Armed with that almost predictive insight, you can take steps to stop those problems before they have a chance to do damage.

The choice is yours

It’s a given that you want to live a long, healthy and active life—and that you want the same for your loved ones.

The question therefore is “What are you doing about it?”

Basically, you have two options:

  1. Manage the process yourself using available medical resources. For example, you can have your genome mapped by any number of health service providers. The question, however, is how to use the genomic information effectively once you have it. You can adjust your diet and exercise more—but that’s not really comprehensive longevity care.
  2. Work with longevity care experts. You can work with physician and care teams who have a deep understanding of longevity care and are actively staying abreast of the latest developments in the field. These experts will regularly monitor developments with your particular biomarkers, with the goal of staying out in front of any illnesses, diseases or other negative health outcomes. They will also provide you with a range of options to address any issues that do crop up, often using more advanced and less invasive health care methods.

Longevity care like this is often available through high-quality concierge medical practices. There are a number of different types of concierge medical practices, but two major types typically provide longevity planning:

  • Physician concierge practices, which a provide a high-level patient experience by ensuring greater access through rapid callbacks, extended office hours and shorter wait times
  • Continuous connected care practices, which use the connectivity provided by technology to deliver care and ensure continuity in the patient experience, regardless of their location or time of day

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: This article was published by the BSW Inner Circle, a global financial concierge group working with affluent individuals and families and is distributed with its permission. Copyright 2017 by AES Nation, LLC.

This article contains the opinions of the authors but not necessarily Donald Wealth Management (the Firm) and does not represent a recommendation of any particular security, strategy or investment product. Information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed. It is not a promotion of Donald Wealth Management’s services. Donald Wealth Management strongly suggests that no investor should act on any of these ideas without first seeking financial advice.

Past performance is not indicative of future results and no representation is made that the stated results will be replicated. The value of an investment is not guaranteed and on encashment you may not get back the full amount invested. Errors and omissions excepted.

Donald Wealth Management is a trading style of Donald Asset Management Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom (FRN: 223784). Donald Asset Management Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 4675082. The registered office address of the Firm is: Stable End, 12 Heather Court Gardens, Four Oaks, West Midlands, B74 2ST.